Arch.Uth Postgraduate Course Postgraduate Course Postgraduate Course Postgraduate Course Arch.Uth UTH.gr Ελληνικά
ANTHROPOLOGY OF ANCIENT GREEK HOUSE
ΘΚ0711, THEORY AND CRITICISM, SCIENTIFIC AREA, SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
Elective at semester(s) 6, 8, ECTS: 3
Taught in: Greek, Not available to ERASMUS students
Cognitive Fields (2005/36/EU): Architectural Design, History and Theories.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

[Comprehension, Analysis, Evaluation]

Prior to the learning outcomes sought by the course, the knowledge starting points of the course are presented:

A. The knowledge subject matter of this course of purely archaeological content is twofold:

- The architecture of the ancient oikia

- The anthropology of oikos

A-1. For the presentation of the first topic, archaeological/architectural evidence is used as presented in publications of houses from Sesklo and Dimini, Mycenae and Tiryns, Lefkandi of Euboea, Skala of Oropos, Zagora of Andros, Xombourgo of Tinos and Emporio of Chios, Athens, Delos, but also from settlements outside Greece, such as Pompeii and Ostia. While,

A-2. The material to be processed for the comprehension of the second topic consists of literary sources, mainly from Homer, Hesiod, Xenophon, Lysias and Pseudo-Aristotle.

A-3. In the alternative, as individual knowledge subject matters and as interpretative tools, the following subjects are studied in particular:

- House as a social unit and its relation to the society of the settlement.

- House as an economic unit (: as a workshop).

- House and its relation with the element of the sanctuary (: the sanctuary within the oikia).

B. We critically examine old and modern approaches to the types of houses in Greece that show the transition from the various forms of livestock society (nomadic pastoral life, pastoral life in summer and winter settlements, livestock breeding life in permanent settlements) to agricultural life and permanent settlements, as these were expressed in the studies of folklorists, anthropologists or even anthropogeographers.

 

On the basis of the above, the following learning outcomes are expected:

1. The acquisition of "a glance", a perspective for studying ancient Greek houses, the one of Anthropology.

[As an Anthropology perspective we mean the interpretation of ancient Greek houses through the research on:

- The functioning of the subjects/users of oikos (the ancient household), namely  mother, father, children, other in- house relatives, domestic slaves, xenoi, pallakai and other persons without blood relation with the family.

- The relationships among them, namely maternity, paternity, adoption, other family relations, slavery, [philo]xenia, pallakia, and finally relationships between third persons and the family.]

2. The exercise of the analytical/interpretive capacity of students on a specific, historically finite subject: houses in ancient Greece

3. The acquisition of a first experience and familiarity for the further interpretation of ancient houses in the light of the relevant studies of Folklore and Anthropology of the traditional houses in Greece.

SUBJECT

 Prior to the learning outcomes sought by the course, the knowledge starting points of the course are presented:

A. The knowledge subject matter of this course of purely archaeological content is twofold:

- The architecture of the ancient oikia

- The anthropology of oikos

A-1. For the presentation of the first topic, archaeological/architectural evidence is used as presented in publications of houses from Sesklo and Dimini, Mycenae and Tiryns, Lefkandi of Euboea, Skala of Oropos, Zagora of Andros, Xombourgo of Tinos and Emporio of Chios, Athens, Delos, but also from settlements outside Greece, such as Pompeii and Ostia. While,

A-2. The material to be processed for the comprehension of the second topic consists of literary sources, mainly from Homer, Hesiod, Xenophon, Lysias and Pseudo-Aristotle.

A-3. In the alternative, as individual knowledge subject matters and as interpretative tools, the following subjects are studied in particular:

- House as a social unit and its relation to the society of the settlement.

- House as an economic unit (: as a workshop).

- House and its relation with the element of the sanctuary (: the sanctuary within the oikia).

B. We critically examine old and modern approaches to the types of houses in Greece that show the transition from the various forms of livestock society (nomadic pastoral life, pastoral life in summer and winter settlements, livestock breeding life in permanent settlements) to agricultural life and permanent settlements, as these were expressed in the studies of folklorists, anthropologists or even anthropogeographers.

 

On the basis of the above, the following learning outcomes are expected:

1. The acquisition of "a glance", a perspective for studying ancient Greek houses, the one of Anthropology.

[As an Anthropology perspective we mean the interpretation of ancient Greek houses through the research on:

- The functioning of the subjects/users of oikos (the ancient household), namely  mother, father, children, other in- house relatives, domestic slaves, xenoi, pallakai and other persons without blood relation with the family.

- The relationships among them, namely maternity, paternity, adoption, other family relations, slavery, [philo]xenia, pallakia, and finally relationships between third persons and the family.]

2. The exercise of the analytical/interpretive capacity of students on a specific, historically finite subject: houses in ancient Greece

3. The acquisition of a first experience and familiarity for the further interpretation of ancient houses in the light of the relevant studies of Folklore and Anthropology of the traditional houses in Greece.

INDICATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY

General introduction to Anthropology and Folklore:

AvdikosV.Gr. [Αυδίκος Β.Γρ.], Εισαγωγή στις σπουδές του λαϊκού πολιτισμού: λαογραφίες – λαϊκοί πολιτισμοί – ταυτότητες, Athens2009.

Erickson P.A. – Murphy L.D., A History of Anthropological Theory, Toronto 1998.

 

The oikos of the ancient Greek house:

Lacey W.K., The family in Classical Greece, London 1968.

Walker S., Women and housing in Ancient Greece: the archaeological evidence, in: A. Cameron and A. Kuhrt (eds.), Images of women in Antiquity, London 1983, 81-91.

 

The architecture of the ancient Greek house:

Hellmann M.-C., L’architecture grecque: 3. Habitat, urbanisme et fortifications, Paris 2010.

Hoepfner W. (Hrsg.)Geschichte des Wohnens, Band 1: 5000 v. Chr. - 500 n. Chr. - Vorgeschichte, Frühgeschichte, Antike, Stuttgart 1998.

 

LECTURE Ι: General Introduction to the Anthropology of houses

Βuchli V., An Anthropology of Architecture, London 2013.

Rapoport A., House form and culture, Englewood Cliffs NJ 1969.

Segaud M., Anthropologie de l’espace: habiter, fonder distribuer, transformer, Paris 2010.

LECTURE ΙΙ: Folklore in place of Anthropology. Modern Greek folklorists as researchers of traditional architecture in Greece

Kyriakidou-NestorosA. [Κυριακίδου-Νέστορος Α.], Η θεωρία της Ελληνικής Λαογραφίας, Athens1978.

PhilippidisD. [Φιλιππίδης Δ.], Ανώνυμη αρχιτεκτονική στην Ελλάδα ή ο Έλληνας Ράποπορτ, in: A. Rapoport, Ανώνυμη αρχιτεκτονική και πολιτιστικοί παράγοντες, Athens2010, 193-332, 339-342.

LECTURE ΙΙΙ: The house in the Neolithic Period, in the Early and Middle Bronze Age

Souvatzi St.G., A Social Archaeology of households in Neolithic Greece: an anthropological approach, Cambridge 2008.

Wiersma C., Building the Bronze Age: architectural and social change on the Greek Mainland during Early Helladic III, Middle Helladic and Late Helladic I, Oxford 2014.

LECTURE ΙV: The house in the Mycenaean period

Darcque P., L’habitat mycénien: formes et fonctions de l’espace bâti en Grèce continentale à la fin du IIe milllénaire avant J.-C., Paris 2005.

SaliT. [Σαλή Τ.], Το μυκηναϊκό μέγαρο με βάση τις πινακίδες της Γραμμικής γραφής Β, Athens1990.

SaliT. [Σαλή Τ.], Λεξικό μυκηναϊκών τεχνικών όρων, Athens1996.

LECTURE V: The house in the Protogeometric-Geometric period

Mazarakis Ainian A., From rulers’ dwellings to temples: architecture and society in Early Iron Age Greece (1100-700 B.C.), Jonserend 1997. 

Rougier-Blanc S., Les maisons homériques. Vocabulaires architectural et sémantique du bâti, Paris 2005.

LECTURE VΙ: The house in the Archaic period

Edouards A.T., Hesiod’s Ascra, Berkeley 2004.

Lang F., Archaische Siedlugen in Griechenland: Struktur und Entwicklung, Berlin 1996.

Lang F., Structural change in Archaic Greek housing, in: B.A. Ault and L.C. Nevett (ed.), Ancient Greek houses and households: chronological, regional, and social diversity, Philadelphia 2005, 12-35.

LECTURE VΙΙ: The house in the Classical Period: the housein the city (asty)

Ginouvès R., Dictionnaire méthodique de l’architecture grecque et romaine III: espaces architecturaux, bâtiments et ensembles, Paris-Roma 1998, (especially pp. 152-171).

Morgan J., The Classical Greek house, Exeter 2010.

 LECTURE VΙΙΙ: Houses in the Classical period: the farmhouse in the chora of thepolis

Ginouvès R., Dictionnaire méthodique de l’architecture grecque et romaine III: espaces architecturaux, bâtiments et ensembles, Paris-Roma 1998, (especially pp.152-171).

Nevett L.C., Between urban and rural: house-form and social relations in Attic villages and Deme centers, in: B.A. Ault and L.C. Nevett (ed.), Ancient Greek houses and households: chronological, regional, and social diversity, Philadelphia 2005, 83-98.

LECTURE ΙΧ: Houses in the Hellenistic period

Hoepfner W. (Hrsg.)Geschichte des Wohnens, Band 1: 5000 v. Chr.-500 n. Chr. - Vorgeschichte, Frühgeschichte, Antike, Stuttgart 1998, (especially pp. 441-524).

Husson G., OIKIA. Le vocabulaire de la maison privée en Égypte d’après les papyrus grecs, Paris 1983.

 LECTURE Χ: From the Greek house to the house of the Roman era

Adam J.-P., La maison romaine, Arles 2012.

Graham J.W., Origins and interrelations of the Greek house and the Roman house, Phoenix 20 (1974), 3-31.

Gros P., L’architecture romaine: 2. Maisons, palais, villas et tombeaux, Paris 2001.

Hellmann M.-Ch., Vitruve et lʼinvention dʼune maison grecque, in: A. Blouet (dir.), DʼOrient et dʼOccident, Mélanges offerts à Pierre Aupert, Bordeaux 2008, 61-72.

LECTURE ΧΙ: Omitting the intermediate periods (Early Christian, Byzantine, Ottoman): from the ancient Greek house to the traditional Greek house

Gounaris A.P., Pastoral structures: the encounter of Early Iron Age Archaeology with Ethnography in Mainland Greece, in: A. Mazarakis Ainian (ed.), The “Dark Ages” Revisited, Volos 2011, 247-265.